Tenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry

Tullahoma Campaign

In the summer of 1863, the 10th Kentucky was part of the 2nd Brigade in General John Brannan’s Division in the Tullahoma Campaign.  I could not find any reports for Col. William Hays, but the activities for the regiment are included in General Brannan’s reports.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIII/1 [S# 34]
JUNE 23-JULY 7, 1863.--The Middle Tennessee, or Tullahoma, Campaign.
No. 17.--Reports of Brig. Gen. John M. Brannan, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Garrison Creek, Tenn., June 26, 1863.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that, in accordance with instructions from corps headquarters, I reported at 8 a.m. this day (June 26, 1863) to Major-General Rousseau, on the Manchester pike. By his direction, I moved my division to the right of the pike, with a view to turn the flank of the rebel position on the heights north of Garrison Creek.

Having succeeded in forming line, under a pretty brisk fire of musketry, I advanced the First Brigade, Col. M. B. Walker commanding, on the right, while with the Second, Brig. Gen. J. B. Steedman, and the Third, Col. F. Van Derveer, I supported the advance of the First Division on the center and left. After a determined but ineffectual resistance on the part of the rebels, we gained the first position, while the rebels with great rapidity took up a position on the commanding heights south of Garrison Creek. Having established batteries on the position lately taken from the enemy, the Second Brigade of my division, supported by a portion of the First Division, were thrown forward, and again succeeded in dislodging the rebels from their position.

The enemy then attempted to enfilade us from the high ground on our right, but in this were effectually prevented by the gallant and determined manner in which they were attacked and driven back by Colonel Walker's brigade.
The conduct of the troops was everything that could be wished. In accordance with orders from General Rousseau, I am encamped on Scott's Branch of Garrison Creek. <ar34_451>

The loss in killed and wounded is as follows:

Command  Enlisted men killed  Commissioned officers
wounded
Enlisted men
wounded
First Brigade:      
17th Ohio 3   21
31st Ohio   1 12
38th Ohio     6
82d Indiana     2
4th Michigan Light Battery 1    
Total First Brigade 4 4 41
       
Second Brigade:      
10th Kentucky     1
10th Indiana     1
74th Indiana     1
Total Second Brigade     3
       
Aggregate 4 1 44

Note--Two horses killed.
I will send a more complete report of killed and wounded as soon as it can be prepared.(*)

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
J. M. BRANNAN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT,
Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of Staff, Fourteenth Army Corps.

 

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
In Camp, Manchester, Tenn., June 28, 1863.

COLONEL: In accordance with orders of this date, I have the honor to submit the following summary of the operations of my division during the past five days:

By direction of Maj. Gen. G. Granger, commanding Reserve Corps, I advanced from Triune, Tenn., at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, June 23, 1863, by the Nolensville pike, to within 1 mile of Harpeth River, and thence striking across to the Manchester pike, by way of Winslow's Camp Ground, I arrived at Salem at 6 p.m., and encamped for the night.

At 7 a.m. Wednesday, June 24, I advanced from Salem to Christiana, and relieved General Sheridan's division of the Twentieth Army Corps. I remained at Christiana until relieved, in turn, by General Baird's division of the Reserve Corps, when I advanced 2 miles in the direction of Millersburg, and encamped for the night on Ross' farm, at Henry's Creek. At Christiana my pickets encountered those of the rebels, and kept up a brisk skirmish during my stay at that point, the rebels occasionally bringing a 6-pounder gun to bear upon us, without, however, doing us any injury.

On Thursday, June 25, I was relieved from duty with the Reserve Corps, and ordered to report to the corps proper of the division. I, <ar34_452> however, remained at the Ross farm, at the request of General McCook, commanding on my immediate left, until 11 a.m. that day, when I advanced to Hoover's Mill and encamped for the night.

During the 24th and 25th it rained incessantly, rendering the dirt roads over which 1 was frequently obliged to travel exceedingly difficult for the passage of artillery and wagons. I, however, succeeded in bringing my train through with comparatively little damage.

On Friday, June 26, I reported, according to orders, to Major-General Rousseau, and, in conjunction with his division, effected the passage of Hoover's Gap (an official report of the action attending which I have already forwarded), and encamped that night on the south side of Scott's Brauch of Garrison Creek.

On Saturday, June 27, I advanced to Manchester, via Fairfield, striking the Manchester pike at Powell's farm, and encamped there, under the direction of the major-general commanding the corps.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

 J. M. BRANNAN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT,
Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of Staff, Fourteenth Army Corps. 

 

CRUMPTON'S CREEK, TENN.,
June 29, 1863--9.15 a.m.

I am pressing the enemy in front and right with more than a brigade.

J. M. BRANNAN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

 Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT,
 Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

HEADQUARTERS BRANNAN'S DIVISION, EAST WING,
July 1, 1863--12.45 p.m.

We took possession of Tullahoma, with my advance, at 12 m. No enemy, except a few scattering cavalry. Prisoners captured state that the enemy were 35,000 (infantry) strong, with all their cavalry and artillery--Wheeler, Wharton, and Forrest. The last of the infantry left between midnight and daylight, and their cavalry since. I believe that their rear is totally disorganized.

General Sheridan is here, and, with his cavalry and mine, will pursue the enemy immediately.

I await further instructions.

J. M. BRANNAN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

 Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT.

[Indorsement.]

Have directed Brannan to pursue with his cavalry, and he and Reynolds to join me at Widow Hale's Mill to-morrow, unless otherwise ordered by you. I shall make my headquarters at Widow Hale's Mill to-night, where please send me further instructions.

I still recommend the arrangement suggested in my note of this morning.
I think Stanley can strike them a severe blow at or near Pelham.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS,
Major-General U.S. Army, Comdg. Fourteenth Army Corps

 

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Marsh's Spring, Elk River, July 3, 1863.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit, for the information of the commanding general, a summary of the operations of this division since June 28, 1863.

At 12 m. that day, I left Manchester and proceeded to Crumpton's Creek, in accordance with the orders of the major-general commanding corps, and encamped on as favorable a position as I could obtain. On arriving in camp, the beating of drums could be distinctly heard in front, as also the running of cars at Tullahoma.

My advance was disputed by the enemy's pickets, who kept up a desultory fire on my skirmishers until long after nightfall.

On the following day (June 29), I advanced the Third Brigade, Colonel Van Derveer commanding, of my division, cautiously, about 2 miles on the main road to Tullahoma, meeting with considerable resistance from the rebels. I did not advance farther, as General Sheridan's being the only division of the Twentieth Army Corps so far advanced, he was unable to support me on the right. I threw two regiments of my command about a mile to the front, on the Winchester road, but withdrew them the same night, on the arrival of Reynolds' division at Bobo's Cross-Roads.

On June 30, I relieved the Third Brigade by the Second, of my division, General Steedman commanding, increased by the Thirty-eighth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, from the First Brigade, and pushed forward to within 2½ miles of Tullahoma, supported by Sheridan on my right and Reynolds on my left.

The rebels offered considerable resistance, occasionally bringing field pieces to bear, upon our advancing forces.

On the succeeding day (July 1, 1863), having been ordered to push forward vigorously and feel the enemy, I left Crumpton's Creek at 10 a.m., July 1, with my entire command, and advanced cautiously on the main road to Tullahoma, to within about 1 mile of that town, where, finding the line of works evacuated, I pushed on with all speed to Tullahoma, entering the town close on the retreat of the rebel cavalry, at 12 m. I was shortly afterward joined by Sheridan's division, which had hitherto been my right support.

The rebel works were considerable, and well constructed, effectually covering the road by which I advanced. They had evidently been abandoned in great haste, as I found three large guns and considerable subsistence stores on entering the town. The guns, carriages, and a great portion of the subsistence had been set on fire by the rebels, and were still burning when I arrived. No ammunition was found. I caused the available subsistence stores to be issued to the troops, being out of rations.

The division lost as follows, on the advance from Manchester to Tullahoma: Second Brigade, 15 wounded and 1 missing.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. BRANNAN,
Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE E. FLYNT,
Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of Staff, Fourteenth Army Corps.